Emigre conference to follow Digitizing Enlightenment Symposium

The following call just went out on H-France. The event will follow on from the Second Digitizing Enlightenment Symposium, which takes place at Radboud. Great to see Laure Philip and Juliette Reboul putting the emigre conference together.

Call for Papers

Connected Histories and Memories:

French Emigrants in Revolutionised Europe

Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands), 19-20th June 2017

 

Keynote speakers: Professor Simon Burrows (Western Sydney University, Australia); Professor Kirsty Carpenter (Massey University, New Zealand); Dr. Karine Rance (Université Blaise Pascal, France)

 

Since the publication of the collection of essays on Emigration in Europe edited by Kirsty Carpenter and Philip Mansel in 1999, our knowledge of the emigrant community and that of European responses to the French Revolution have dramatically progressed. The historiography on the subject was renewed with pioneering studies on the Counter-Revolution and Anti-Enlightenment as well as new analysis on the nobility and the heterogeneity of migratory projects. Scholars have ventured into the memorial and literary landscape of emigration, at times articulating literary criticism around the question of trauma and refuge. Research into gender proved to be a fruitful way to challenge previous conceptions of the émigré figure. With this conference, we aim to approach emigration using the notions of connection, transfers and transnationalism, as well as cultural innovations, relating the current knowledge on emigration to studies on the connections between the émigré community and the host country. In particular, we would like to discuss the formation of political and national consciousness deriving from the encounters between the emigrant and their host communities.

This inter-disciplinary event will particularly welcome early career researchers and scholars who have studied or shown an interest in the French émigré community in any European context or beyond. It is open to those researching alternative and trans-national histories of exile in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

 

Participants are invited to give papers, in English or in French, on the following themes:

–          Emigrés, exiles and refugees? Questioning the designations of individual migrants and their community

–          Foreign archival repositories and the renewal of sources on emigration

–          Host discourses on emigration and the creation of an émigré national consciousness

–          Towards a connected history of emigration and the counter-revolution in Europe and the World

–          Against the tide: alternative migratory projects and ruptures with the politically and culturally-dominant émigré group

–          Studying emigration in the twenty-first century

–          The émigré novel and memoirs in the long eighteenth century literary landscape

–    Any other topic relevant to the conference

 

Please email abstract of 300 words by 5th April 2017 to: l.philip@westernsydney.edu.au and j.reboul@let.ru.nl

 

 

Congratulations Vincent Hiribarren

This blog does not tend to cover African history, but today we are pleased to make an exception.

We are delighted to announce the appearance of Vincent Hiribarren‘s doctoral monograph, A History of Borno. Trans-Saharan African Empire to Failing Nigerian State (London: Hurst, 2017).

As the commentary and reviews on the publisher’s website explain, this ‘hugely significant, superbly written, and profoundly interesting’ book charts the nineteenth and twentieth-century history ‘of an ancient Sahelian kingdom whose hinterland is now being laid waste by the Boko Haram insurgency’. Tracing its history back even beyond the foundation of the Bornu Empire (lasted 1380-1893), Borno has had remarkably stable borders and a clearly defined social and political identity, that as the publishers’ reviewers note, ‘calls into question received notions on the nature and sources of political power in Africa, in the past and present,’ and play an important role ‘in the framing of the narratives of Boko Haram’s contemporary jihad.’

The book, of course, also evidences Vincent’s passion for maps and mapping, traits which proved invaluable to his work on the French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe project, too. As followers of this blog will know, Vincent was a technologist and GIS mapper for FBTEE from 2009 to 2012. His work on final editing of the database, our online and downloadable maps and visualizations, and the transfer of the database to Western Sydney in many ways kept the project alive through a difficult transition. In 2013-14 he helped to conceptualize and prepare the next stage of the project, work which contributed to the collaborative article ‘Mapping Print, Connecting Cultures‘. He was a named Research Associate on the FBTEE project’s ARC applications in 2014 and 2015, but before he could take up a position on the ‘Mapping Print, Charting Enlightenment‘ project, he was appointed to a Lectureship in Modern African History at Kings College, London.

So congratulations, Vincent, on the appearance of this important monograph. We hope it is the first of many.

FBTEE wins BSECS Digital Resource Prize

We are pleased to announce that deep into the Australian summer holiday period, FBTEE was awarded the 2017 British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BSECS) Digital Resource Prize at the BSECS annual conference at St Hugh’s college, Oxford, on 5 January.

Here is how Laure Philip announced the prize at our own institution (while I was busy sunning myself down the coast – so my warmest thanks, Laure). The announcement is accompanied by a rather hastily prepared ‘Oscar style’ acceptance video-presentation speech – finished minutes before I departed on the family’s annual holiday – which also gives a brief account of our current work. Enjoy!

‘The Digital Humanities Research Group is extremely honoured to announce that the French Book Trade and Enlightenment database (FBTEE) has been nominated by the British Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (BSECS) for the Digital Resource Prize today in Oxford. FBTEE was launched in 2012 at the University of Leeds by Professor Simon Burrows. It involved the work of many talented researchers, designers and scholars and a second stage of FBTEE’s development is being funded by the Australian Research Council and Western Sydney University, where the project is now based. This prize not only celebrates the originality of the FBTEE database but also the outstanding ongoing work done by all team members.

Please click on link below to hear project leader Professor Simon Burrows thank everyone and explain what this state of the art database is about and how it can help revise our understanding of the eighteenth-century book trade:

 

 

Digitizing Enlightenment, 12-13 July 2016

We are pleased to announce that details and how to register for the Digitizing Enlightenment symposium to be held at Western Sydney’s Parramatta campus on 12-13 July are now available here.

The symposium brings together representatives of several leading Digital Humanities projects dealing with the Enlightenment in France and/or Europe to discuss the development of the field, findings, technologies and methodologies, and where our research is heading.

Projects represented will include ‘Mapping the Republic of Letters’; the Electronic Enlightenment; the Comédie Française Registers Project; ARTFL’s Encyclopédie project; MEDIATE and of course FBTEE itself.

The symposium precedes the George Rudé Seminar, which will take place at Parramatta from 13-16 July.

Welcome to FBTEE

The FBTEE team is proud to announce the appointment of Dr Katherine McDonough as Research Associate on our Australian Research Council’s Mapping Print, Charting Enlightenment (MPCE) project.

 

Katie McDonough is currently based at Bates College in Maine, but she did her doctoral work at Stanford (and much else besides) under the mentorship of Keith Michael Baker and Dan Edelstein.

She has thus worked with two of the most intellectually innovative Enlightenment/French revolutionists from two different generations, and has participated in some of the projects of the Mapping the Republic of Letters team.

Katie is already an accomplished digital humanist, and has a particular expertise in mapping and spatial history which grows out of her innovative doctoral work on infrastructure development and provincial society in late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France. This is all experience that will be invaluable to the FBTEE project.

Katie will be working with us on the ‘Mapping the French novel‘ strand of the MPCE project.

FBTEE is delighted at Katie’s appointment from a strong field, and we look forward to welcoming them to Western Sydney. They should both be here in good time to participate in the George Rudé Seminar and Digitizing Enlightenment symposium in July.

 

Digitizing Enlightenment

Digitizing Enlightenment is the name of a symposium we are holding at Western Sydney’s Parramatta campus on 12-13 July 2016. It will bring together a stellar cast of chief investigators and participants on some of the most exciting digital projects around, including our old friends Mapping the Republic of Letters, the Comédie francaise registers project, ARTFL, FBTEE, Electronic Enlightenment, as well as some newer players in the field. We will be talking about the history and development of these projects, the methods and techniques they have developed, key findings and lessons, future collaborations and how digital scholarship has and is changing eighteenth-century studies. It promises to be a great curtain-raiser for the George Rudé Seminar in French History and Civilization, which will be held at the same venue on 13-16 July. There will be podcasts of the discussions for those who cannot make it in person, and there will be a book, too. We are also looking for scholars and students who have made innovative use of the resources to be discussed as potential participants … much more will follow in July. Can’t wait.

FBTEE in Russian

A couple of years ago, I was invited to submit a piece to the Annuaire d’études françaises, for a special edition to mark the 225th anniversary of the French Revolution, to be edited by Alexandre Tchoudinov et Dmitri Bovykine. And as a free bonus they have even translated it into Russian. For those of you who missed it, the title is ‘БИБЛИОМЕТРИЯ, ПОПУЛЯРНОЕ ЧТЕНИЕ И ЛИТЕРАТУРНОЕ ПОЛЕ ИЗДАТЕЛЯ ЭПОХИ ПРОСВЕЩЕНИЯ’ and my name has been rendered in Russian as Саймон Барроуз. I think that must be right, but as my name has been mistranscribed in English in the table of contents as Sidney Burrows, I’m not quite sure. Ironically, I was indeed nearly named Sidney, as my mother is a primary teacher and felt that it would help me to write my name by the time I went to school if it was composed of the three very different letter shapes S-I-D. And for those more interested in the article, its original English title was ‘Bibliometrics, Popular Reading, and the Literary Field of an Enlightenment Publisher’. I suspect that sounds better in Russian!